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December 24, 2018

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Three is a Magic Number

March 28, 2017

 

 

In the business world, I have always promoted the use of 3 many times and in many ways.  Why not.  Steve Jobs did it so it must be right.  I was at a client the other day and we were discussing his management team.  He wasn’t getting any information out of them on a regular basis.  I advised to have each of them present to him 3 Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).  He asked, why 3?  I told him that it wouldn’t be too burdensome on his team to come up with 3 KPI each.  That night, I questioned my insistence on 3 KPIs, so I decided to consider other numbers.

 

The simplest question I wanted to answer was; Why not 2 or 4?  When I started to research the number 3, there were tons of examples of its use; 3 bids on a job, 3 levels of pricing, 3 Stooges, 3 Little Pigs, 3 acts in a play, etc.  The list was quite long, but there were still no good reasons why to use 3.  Once I began focusing on science and psychology I started to get some useful information.

 

Three is the least amount of something to; see trends, get perspective, or the depth of something.  If we lived in a 2-dimensional world we wouldn’t be able to see the depth of things.  If we get 2 bids on a job, we’re not getting much perspective as to which bid is best.  If we receive 2 data points, we are not yet able to understand trends.  You need to get to 3 of something to get depth and perception.  I suppose this holds true for groups of 3 people as well.  The depth of a conversation is much greater with that third person.  So why not 4?  Take the example of getting bids on a job.  We don’t want to create more work than necessary, so let’s get to the point where we have perspective and cut it off there.

 

On the lighter side of things, here are a few more tidbits:

 

For those who remember Schoolhouse Rock, click on this link and try not to sing along.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aU4pyiB-kq0

 

I thought a hockey hat trick originated from hockey, but it doesn’t.  The term first appeared in 1858 in the game of cricket.  When a player takes three wickets on three consecutive deliveries it’s called a hat trick.  The bowler would receive a hat from his club commemorating the feat, and sometimes passed it around to collect cash.

 

Let me know why you love the number 3.

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